An occupational therapist can work directly with your child and/or consult with the parent to provide strategies and tools to help your child function more independently in their daily activities.

 
  • Trouble manipulating and playing with toys purposefully

  • Poor posture resulting in a child leaning into surfaces and having difficulty sitting upright

  • Poor grasp on markers, crayons, and pencils affecting writing, scribbling, and coloring

  • Difficulty using two hands together to cut with scissors, write and hold the paper, and pull apart resistive toys.

  • Difficulty moving both sides of the body in a coordinated manner and appearing clumsy

  • Trouble processing sensory information in the areas of touch, sound, vision, oral motor, and movement

  • Seeking excessive movement and navigating the environment unsafely

  • Low frustration tolerance and having big reactions to small problems

  • Difficulty socializing with peers and noticing social cues

  • Difficulty attending and following directions

  • Needing help with feeding, dressing, hygiene, and tying shoes,

  • Difficulty throwing and catching a ball